Planned Giving

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APS Member Sue Barman Establishes New Professional Opportunity Award

APS Member Sue Barman Establishes New Professional Opportunity Award

Sue Barman, PhD, FAPS, has held many titles within APS since joining the Society in the 1980s—Central Nervous System (CNS) Section Steering Committee member, Councilor and President to name a few. With her history of service, it's no surprise that she is continuing her support now and into the future with the new Susan M. Barman Professional Opportunity Award for Research in Central Autonomic Neurophysiology.

Barman became an APS member during her graduate studies in the physiology department at Loyola University Medical Center. Barman's involvement picked up speed when she agreed to serve on the CNS Section Steering Committee at the request of APS member Celia Sladek in the late 1980s. "Early on I realized—and appreciated the fact—that the APS is really a member-driven Society. Many of the programs it supports have their birth in individual and group members of the APS. The APS has become like an extended family for me."

Now a professor of physiology at Michigan State University, Barman remains a strong supporter of professional membership organizations. "Joining a professional organization early in your career should be a priority. I have been a strong advocate of promoting APS activities that maintain the physiology pipeline and provide benefits to trainees and junior scientists," she says.

Professional membership can also provide a path to a lasting legacy in one's field. Surely, the Susan M. Barman Professional Opportunity Award for Research in Central Autonomic Neurophysiology will be part of Barman's legacy in physiology.

"I was inspired by the decision of my friend Beverly Petterson Bishop when she announced that she and her husband Charles, upon their death, would donate funds to the APS that would annually provide a substantial award to recognize a junior scientist who has shown outstanding promise in neuroscience research. And as I mentioned, APS has become like a family to me, so it seemed natural to add the APS as one of the beneficiaries of my estate."

Barman challenges her colleagues to consider making an endowment of their own. "A planned gift to the APS is an opportunity to make a lasting impact on something that has been important to you during your career. APS has had an outstanding track record of using their resources to benefit its members. I am confident that funds donated will be carefully managed and used to make your wishes come true."


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